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Minestrone soup

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1 Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:32 am

Barbara101

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zucci,green beans,carrots,onion,Bell pepper ,stir fry each.Then add the cabbage. tomatoes,spices,I let it simmer 1 hr or so,even longer if you want.. then add the rest..


What I add last 30 minutes..
a coupe hand fulls of frozen cheese tortellini.

a couple links of browned Italian sausage.

I use half a head of reg green cabbage sliced thin.
cannelioni beans in the can rinsed. I had those last.

I like grated Fontini cheese on top.Big hunk of Italian bread lol.



Last edited by Barbara101 on Sat Jun 07, 2014 8:09 pm; edited 2 times in total

2 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:45 am

Barbara101

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3 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:47 am

Barbara101

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4 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 12:03 pm

bethk

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Looks like an Italian vegetable soup to me!

I've never seen it with the tortilini (sp?) before, just that little ditalini (small tube) pasta. I'll bet it makes it a really satisfying meal.

5 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 12:36 pm

Crybaby

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Barbara, it's not only beautiful but it looks delicious, too. I like your addition of the cheese tortellini, too.


  

6 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 12:51 pm

Barbara101

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Crybaby wrote:Barbara, it's not only beautiful but it looks delicious, too.  I like your addition of the cheese tortellini, too.  


  



  recipe came from Silver Palate Good Times. Best cookbook ever lol


BTW that big pot will last me 2 days.. I am a hog ..lol not really but I have big bowl for dinner,then lunch,then dinner again..

7 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:01 pm

Crybaby

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Barbara101 wrote:BTW that big pot will last me 2 days.. I am a hog ..lol not really but I have big bowl for dinner,then lunch,then dinner again..

I do that with big pots of stuff, too -- I made a big pot of red beans last week, and also recently made a big pot of smoked turkey, andouille and oyster gumbo. Ate it the same way you did (grin) but saved some for the freezer, too. The cold weather here makes me want hearty dishes like these.

8 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:06 pm

Barbara101

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smoked turkey, andouille and oyster gumbo.


oh now you need to post this lol.  I  plan on smoking a turkey..It is oyster season here.I can pick up some fresh ones .

9 Re: Minestrone soup on Sun Feb 02, 2014 2:55 pm

Imelda HL

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thank you Barbara... I'll cook it later this week.. I have most of the ingredients in my fridge... carrots.. tomatoes.. zucchini.. kale.. potatoes.. I'll need celery.. I might add lentils instead of beans.. we'll see   Smile

10 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:55 pm

Crybaby

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Barbara101 wrote:smoked turkey, andouille and oyster gumbo.

oh now you need to post this lol.  I  plan on smoking a turkey..It is oyster season here.I can pick up some fresh ones .

Well, I don't have a recipe for it but I can tell you how I do it.  

First, I make the turkey stock.  I pick as much of the good pieces of meat off the turkey and put it aside; I also take the meat off of the turkey legs, too.  I put the turkey carcass, the skin and all the bones in a large soup pot (including whatever is inside the turkey carcass), add a large onion cut into four (I don't even peel it), about four stalks of celery cut in half, and some peppercorns and then put enough water into the pot to cover everything (you can break the carcass into two parts if necessary).  I cook this stock down for three or more hours, skimming the foamy stuff off the top as it appears.  Once my stock tastes good, I strain it into a colander.  Then I strain it again in a finer mesh strainer, like a chinois.  I dispose of all the meat and bones that were strained.  If you don't use the fine strainer at this point, the gumbo is fine but the next day when everything settles, you will have a lot of fine, gooky stuff in the bottom of the gumbo pot, which I don't like.  

Meanwhile, I slice about two large "sticks" of andouille sausage (locally made andouille from Jacob's in LaPlace, LA, are about 12 to 14 inches long so it's a good bit of andouille), and brown it in the gumbo pot.  I do this in stages, so I can get the andouille slices brown, then remove them to the side, and add more.  When finished, set aside.  

Then I make a roux, which I do in the microwave.  It's easy to do, your arm won't fall off from stirring the roux in the pot for about 30 minutes, you'll have plenty enough and can add what you want, and any leftover can go in a jar in the fridge.  You can then use a tablespoon here and there when you need it to thicken something up that you're cooking.  I put about a half cup of bacon grease into a large pyrex bowl with a handle and then I add a generous half cup of flour.  Stir this together with a wooden spoon.  Microwave on high for three minutes and then stir.  Then cook roux on high in 30-second increments, stirring after each, until the roux is the color of a copper penny.  

Then I pour some hot roux in the now empty gumbo pot.  I usually put enough in the pot so there's about a quarter-inch on the bottom of the pot.  Then I put about three large onions, chopped, into the roux, stirring well.  I add about four or five large pods of garlic minced (we call them "toes" in N.O.) into the onion/roux mix.  After cooking that a couple of minutes, I add about six stalks of celery, chopped, to the mix.  I season all this with a tad of salt, a good amount of black pepper, and about a teaspoon of thyme, "smashed" between your fingers prior to adding to the pot.  I usually cook this mixture for about 10 to 15minutes to let the flavors meld.  

Then I add the warm turkey stock (not hot) to the onion/garlic/celery mix, stirring it in.  It should thicken up (you don't really want your stock thick) a bit.  You can taste and add seasoning here as well.  I'd add salt, pepper, a bay leaf or two, a bit of Tabasco and some cayenne pepper.  Use as little or as much as you like.  Let this cook, say 10 or 15 minutes.  

Then take out a coffee cup of the stock and set aside.  Once this cools a bit (can still be warm), stir in about 1/4 cup of file and let sit.  You might have lumps of file in there now, but as times goes on, just stir again, pressing any lumps against the side of the coffee cup to remove.  This can cool completely so don't worry about it.  

Once your stock is tasty and the thickness you like (you can always add more roux if you want it a tad thicker, stirring and cooking for a while after each addition), add back in the turkey meat you picked off the turkey.  Cook about a half-hour, tasting for seasonings and adding more if you want.  I'd go easy on the salt until the end.  

Then add your browned andouille to the gumbo and cook another 15 or 20 minutes.  You might want to skim some of the fat off the top, as the andouille, though not very greasy, will add some as it warms up.  

Then I'd stir in the coffee cup full of stock and file.  You will notice that the gumbo not only thickens up a bit (it shouldn't be thick but just have some nice body), but the file adds a lot of flavor.  Once you add the file, DO NOT BOIL the gumbo.  The file will "thread" into slimy stuff, almost like okra does, if you boil it.  You can simmer it but just do not boil.  Same thing when reheating -- don't boil it once the file is in.

Once that cooks for about 10 or 15 minutes and you like the flavor (if not, add more Tabasco, salt or pepper), your gumbo is almost done.  Pour in your oysters (I usually use a pint or two, depending on how much gumbo I'm making), including the oyster liquor, and stir to mix.  Your gumbo will be ready to serve in about 10 minutes.  The oyster liquor really adds some dynamite flavor, too.  Use a ladle so you can get turkey, andouille and a couple of oysters in each bowl, over a small amount of rice.

This gumbo doesn't contain okra but file instead.  Some people use both the okra and file but not me.  Also, some people sprinkle on the file at the table but most locals don't do this.  You don't get the thickening properties of the file that way and you don't get as much flavor from it either.  It gives the gumbo a nice color, too, when mixed with some stock and added to the pot.

I also make the gumbo without any bones.  My mom did not do it that way, but like I said before, I don't like the gumbo the next day if you cook it with the bones, as all the small pieces of meat/bones end up in the bottom inch of the gumbo pot and I don't like the look, taste or texture that happens.  Plus, it's so much easier to serve without bones.  You've also milked most of the flavor out of the bones and carcass in your stock, so it's not like you haven't used the bones.  

Serve with some hot French bread (or garlic bread) and have some hot sauce on the table in case anyone wants more.  

If I'm going to freeze some, I ladle it into freezer containers now and let cool.  This way, you can get some of the turkey, andouille and oysters in each container for the freezer.  

I know this is long but it's what I do, Barb.  Hope it helps.



Last edited by Crybaby on Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:17 pm; edited 2 times in total

11 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:05 pm

Barbara101

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gosh M you went to a lot of trouble posting this Thank you so much..I use file the same way.I plan on smoking a small turkey,then will proceed with the recipe as you typed it.

  

12 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:13 pm

Crybaby

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Barbara101 wrote:gosh M you went to a lot of trouble posting this  Thank you so much..I use file the same way.I plan on smoking a small turkey,then will proceed with the recipe as you typed it.

  

It's funny, Barb, as I closed my eyes every couple of minutes while typing to "make it" in my head. I decided I'm going to copy it and keep it with my recipes in case anyone asks for it again. I was happy to do it for you, B, as you always go to so much trouble posting your photos and letting us know what you're cooking all the time.

13 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:30 pm

Barbara101

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14 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:31 pm

Crybaby

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Ditto!

15 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:03 pm

Crybaby

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Barbara, I forgot to tell you that if you need more liquid, just add some low salt chicken broth. I do this often if I need more liquid.

16 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:28 pm

bethk

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Crybaby, that sounds like an amazingly flavorful meal....and like a full day of fun cooking!

And when you wrote:

"but the next day when everything settles, you will have a lot of fine, gooky stuff in the bottom of the gumbo pot, which I don't like"

I knew EXACTLY what you were talking about ~ When I make stock I always strain it and put it into the refrigerator overnight so I can remove all the fat (which I think tastes nasty when reheated). After I remove the fat is when I usually reheat and strain for the last time through some cheesecloth before proceeding with whatever I'm making. All the bits of gooky stuff gets caught and disposed of.

17 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 8:37 pm

JanaAZ


bethk wrote:Crybaby, that sounds like an amazingly flavorful meal....and like a full day of fun cooking!

And when you wrote:

"but the next day when everything settles, you will have a lot of fine, gooky stuff in the bottom of the gumbo pot, which I don't like"

I knew EXACTLY what you were talking about ~ When I make stock I always strain it and put it into the refrigerator overnight so I can remove all the fat (which I think tastes nasty when reheated).  After I remove the fat is when I usually reheat and strain for the last time through some cheesecloth before proceeding with whatever I'm making.  All the bits of gooky stuff gets caught and disposed of.

If I don't have time for that, I use my OXO fat separator to get the fat out. I pour the liquid through a cheesecloth lined strainer. Works like a charm. (I almost said 'cheesecake-lined strainer'. That would be interesting!!!)

18 Re: Minestrone soup on Mon Feb 03, 2014 10:39 pm

bethk

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I had one of those but it got a big crack in it and I haven't replaced it....it did work good, though.

19 Re: Minestrone soup on Tue Feb 04, 2014 5:51 pm

Crybaby

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Bethk wrote:"but the next day when everything settles, you will have a lot of fine, gooky stuff in the bottom of the gumbo pot, which I don't like"

I knew EXACTLY what you were talking about ~ When I make stock I always strain it and put it into the refrigerator overnight so I can remove all the fat (which I think tastes nasty when reheated). After I remove the fat is when I usually reheat and strain for the last time through some cheesecloth before proceeding with whatever I'm making. All the bits of gooky stuff gets caught and disposed of.

Laughed, as I guess I'm not alone feeling this way. That's why I don't put meat on the bone in my gumbo like my Mom did, as then you just can't avoid that stuff in the bottom of the pot. Plus, I think it tastes much better if you make the stock first and then create your gumbo.

Speaking of gumbo, Brian asked me earlier today if I wanted to defrost some that we stashed in the freezer. It didn't take him long to want some more. But it's a gray-looking day and though temps are in the mid- to low 60s, it's going to be rainy and cold again tonight and tomorrow.

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