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Corned Beef Hash -- recipe included but I'd like yours

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Crybaby

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My DH has recently re-discovered corned beef hash in the can. I think it's Armour brand. Not that I expect such a dish to be low cal, but the ingredients/fat/sodium/calorie label makes me crazy. (We didn't have any non-stick pans so I recently bought him two Calphalon non-stick pans in 8" and 10" (on sale) and the man was in heaven, as his canned stuff was sticking to our cast iron skillets for some reason.)

I saw this in BA this month and though the included picture looks exactly like the stuff in the can, the cabbage in it puzzled me.

Do any of you have a recipe for corned beef hash or could just tell me how you do it? I'm definitely going to try making this soon but figured I'd check with you all first.

Corned Beef Hash
Serves 6. Recipe from Bon Appétit, May, 2013.

6 Tbsp. (3/4 stick) unsalted butter
1 medium red onion, thinly sliced
6 garlic cloves, smashed
2 cups thinly sliced green cabbage
1-1/2 lb. Yukon Gold potatoes (about 4 large), peeled, coarsely grated
1 tsp. Four Seasons Blend* (this is kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper, garlic salt and cayenne pepper – I’d probably just season with three of these, as I don’t use garlic salt but rather granulated garlic if not using fresh)
12 oz. cooked corned beef, cute into matchstick-size pieces)
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Melt butter in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, garlic, and cabbage; cook, stirring occasionally, until onion and cabbage are golden brown and crisp at edges, 15-20 minutes.

Add potatoes and Four Seasons Blend*; cook, occasionally scraping up browned bits from bottom and folding into hash, until potatoes are crisp and cooked through, 20-25 minutes. Fold in corned beef and cook until crisp, about 5 minutes. Fold once more.

This recipe is entitled Corned Beef Hash with Eggs and also comes with a recipe for Dried Chile Salsa and Four Seasons Blend. I just eliminated the eggs and that seasoning blend, as my husband, the CBH fan, wouldn’t like eggs on top and the seasoning blend didn’t do anything for me.

bethk

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Michelle, I don't have a real "recipe" so much as a remembered method my dad used when making hash (corned beef or roast beef) that was made as a lunch dish when we had leftovers of either corned beef or pot roast.

Dad would get out the hand grinder - the kind that got screwed on the edge of the kitchen table or thick cutting board - and he'd grind the meat, raw potatoes, raw onions, raw carrots, a few slices of raw bacon, (and probably) raw cabbage. Then he'd mix it all together, season with a lot of black pepper and mush it all in the big cast iron skillet with a lid on. The first side got cooked lower and slower than the second side to allow everything to cook through. When he turned it in "hunks" (technical cooking term we always used at home....) he would mash it down and add some margarine (Mom only bought Imperial Margarine) and turn up the heat to get a good crust. If he wanted eggs with it he would do "over easy" in a different pan and serve them on top of the hash on his plate.

Another way I've done the same thing is to break down the corned beef or roast beef in my mini chop and then mash the leftover cooked vegetables from a corned beef dinner or pot roast (potatoes, carrots, onions, celery) with a potato masher and mix everything together and season as I felt like it, usually just s&p. I smush it into a non-stick pan with butter added to aid browning, crusting and flavor and cook on medium high to get it nice and crispy. Just like Dad, I prefer my eggs cooked separately and just placed on top so when I break through the runny yolks it can all be mixed in - like a faux hollandaise sauce with no work at all!

As for the cabbage (and I'm a big fan of cooked cabbage, although many are not) I think the reason is it is an inexpensive filler and corned beef hash was a way to have a smaller amount of meat to stretch to feed a family.

bethk

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Crybaby - how odd....when I was working in the kitchen I had the TV tuned to The Food Network (noise company) and Diners, Drive-ins and Dives was on. The diner they featured was one that made corned beef hash. The owner used an electric grinder to grind homemade corned beef, potatoes and onions. I didn't see it from the start but when I noticed it I certainly stopped and paid attention.... The owner said the raito of corned beef to potato was 3 to one, very heavy with ground cooked corned beef.

They crusted it well on both sides on a flat top grill and served it with an easy over egg on top.

Crybaby

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bethk wrote:Crybaby - how odd....when I was working in the kitchen I had the TV tuned to The Food Network (noise company) and Diners, Drive-ins and Dives was on. The diner they featured was one that made corned beef hash. The owner used an electric grinder to grind homemade corned beef, potatoes and onions. I didn't see it from the start but when I noticed it I certainly stopped and paid attention.... The owner said the raito of corned beef to potato was 3 to one, very heavy with ground cooked corned beef.

They crusted it well on both sides on a flat top grill and served it with an easy over egg on top.

The same thing happened to me with that recipe in Bon Appetit, Beth. I told Brian I would ask my "forum" friends for a good recipe (or a "how to," which is fine with me) and poof! There it was in the very next issue!

Thanks for letting me know how your Dad did it. Believe it or not, I have one of those silver cast iron grinders that I use to make pepper jelly. Years ago, I told my Mom I needed one to make the jelly and she dug in one of her cabinets and came out with one in the box she'd never used. It was heavy as all get out and, of course, the the clamp doesn't fit "modern" thicknesses so I have to jury rig it (with a bowl on the floor!!!). My mom was a registered nurse who enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps during WWII. She told me people told her that the meat would be so tough that she would need a grinder -- NOT! The best thing is it's made by Montgomery Ward and the brand is embossed in the cast iron and my favorite was the price on the box -- $1.39!!!! The box has pretty much disintegrated by now (she gave it to me about 24 years ago and she'd held onto it since the early 1940s) but I just can't make myself throw away that box!

bethk

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Crybaby wrote: The best thing is it's made by Montgomery Ward and the brand is embossed in the cast iron and my favorite was the price on the box -- $1.39!!!! The box has pretty much disintegrated by now (she gave it to me about 24 years ago and she'd held onto it since the early 1940s) but I just can't make myself throw away that box!

Even if you have to put the box in one of those gigantic 3 gallon size zip bags and support it with wadded up newspapers....it's worth any trouble to keep it. I mean, think about it, you have the ENTIRE package and contents and it's almost 75 years old.

I live in The Villages....I KNOW what a 75 yr. old LOOKS LIKE !!!

LOL

Crybaby

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Even if you have to put the box in one of those gigantic 3 gallon size zip bags and support it with wadded up newspapers....it's worth any trouble to keep it. I mean, think about it, you have the ENTIRE package and contents and it's almost 75 years old.

I live in The Villages....I KNOW what a 75 yr. old LOOKS LIKE !!!

Good idea, B.

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