Cooking Friends

Friends sharing recipes, cooking techniques & menu ideas in a friendly atmosphere.


You are not connected. Please login or register

OCTOBER, 2018 - What's cooking for dinner / supper?

Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 9, 10, 11  Next

Go down  Message [Page 2 of 11]

Crybaby

avatar
Bugster2 wrote:Krispie Kreme donuts are probably off the list too.



 Absolutely hilarious, Debbie! And we ALL know what a struggle THAT will be.

Poor Jimmy, as it's not going to be easy and I know it won't be easy for Tina either as she's going to have to be a quasi "disciplinarian" since she does the shopping and she's the one usually out and about and who picks up the stuff he goes crazy for when she brings it home to him.

I can empathize as I have to harp at Brian for eating too much sweet stuff (little white donuts, sweet rolls, cookies, candies, cakes, pudding, brownies, etc.). It's not his weight I worry about as his cancer treatment -- more changes now coming but I'll save THAT bad news for another day -- is still kind of rough on him and his stomach but it's just the AMOUNT of crap he consumes. He warns me at night not to serve him very much dinner and then barely finishes his plate most nights, saying he can't help it that he's full. He'll eat a BIT more when it's something he's crazy about (e.g., panéed chicken with tarragon cream sauce) but for someone his size, he eats very small meals (unless it's sweet rolls for breakfast!). But then 10 minutes after dinner, he's carrying a bowl of ice cream upstairs that's so big you'd think he needs assistance carrying it! I can't fuss at him every single time (who WANTS to be a nag?!) but I try to speak up a couple of times a week and explain that not only do I worry he's not eating enough food that's truly good for him but I worry what all that sugar and other crap that's in that stuff is doing to his body.

Jimmy, I hope you read this when you're back here so you give Tina a break. She not only wants you around for a while but she wants to spare you pain, illness, stints in the hospital and worse. So give her a break and know what she's going through when you're begging her for bacon, okay?!

And I hope you know how worried we all were (and are). As you can see, no one even wanted to post anything until Beth stepped in and said we needed to give you something to see when you came back. WE want you around for a while, too! You're truly the backbone of this group as we're pretty lost when you're not around.

Maybe the rest of us can take Jimmy's dietary restrictions as a challenge to try to post some recipes, and ideas too, for him to see that he can still enjoy some of his favorite foods if he makes a few changes in how he prepares some things. I'm going to try to find some things that deal with the foods/ways of cooking we know he will miss but can no longer have or at least indulge in with any regularity.

Can't wait until you're back, Jimmy!!!! And STOP scaring us!!



Last edited by Crybaby on Sun Oct 07, 2018 1:40 pm; edited 1 time in total

Crybaby

avatar
bethk wrote:I made chicken breast chunks, marinated in the Korean BBQ Sauce with zucchini and onions. Andrea made some sweet coconut rice to plate under it. Tori decided she prefers plain rice so she had a packet of "ready rice" heated just for her. The coconut rice was a really nice compliment to the Korean BBQ chicken.  Forgot to take a picture.....I must be getting old.


Beth, did Andrea have some of that Koreban BBQ Sauce or did you bring a bottle with you?

Not only are we in love with that sauce -- I have to keep Brian on a short leash with the stuff or he'll make me sick of it like he did with regular barbecue sauce -- but our friend Pete is gaga over it, too. The last time I bought it online I found a better deal if I got four bottles, one of which went to Pete, who's single and really on a tight budget since he retired since he pretty much has to rely solely on his Social Security, which is no easy task. We need to make sure he's well stocked with the KBBQ Sauce, too. He's been a friend for so many years (I've known Pete longer than I've known Brian, since I was 19) and he does a lot for Brian and for the two of us. He's one of those friends you could call at 3 in the morning to tell him your car broke down and he'd head to you immediately.

Crybaby

avatar
Do you guys who are married sometimes think of the exact same thing at the very same time? Brian and I do this so often that it sometimes spooks both of us, especially him.

This past week Brian mentioned while we were having coffee that he was wondering what we'd make for dinner that night. As you guys know, we usually make enough food that we have leftovers for meals for a night or two after "firstees." We'd polished off the leftovers the prior evening. So about 20 minutes later, Brian said, "I was thinking about a stir-fry with those two boneless pork chops we have in the freezer." I laughed out loud, as I was just thinking of making Beth's version of Sweet and Sour Pork which was the dish I knew he was thinking of. It was shocking because I don't think Brian has EVER suggested a stir-fry in the 39 years we've been together (too little meat, too many vegetables).

I knew we had a can of pineapple chunks in the fridge so Beth, I made your version of Sweet and Sour Pork. Granted, cutting up a pork tenderloin would've been my preferred choice of pork for this dish due to that cut's texture but the two boneless pork chops were a better choice so we could use them up, and using them in this fashion meant we'd have our all-important leftovers from a mere two pork chops! I'd just be careful to brown the meat quickly and just make sure I didn't overcook it in the initial dish so it wouldn't be rock hard when reheating it the next day (and it wasn't).

If you remember, the last time I made this stir-fry, we didn't have the pineapple juice which I think is pretty crucial to give it that flavor of that orange gooey Sweet and Sour Pork you get from Chinese restaurants, which I hate and he adores. It's not the flavor I don't like but the dayglo orange color and the insipid consistency of that pasty sauce that I dislike so much (plus the fact that there are so many other dishes we could get when having Chinese food).

Brian got everthing ready for me and when I came downstairs later in the day to make it, I was amazed at how good his mis en place was! He'd asked me for the notes I copied from Beth's "recipe" so I printed them out for him. He had two small onions peeled, two big carrots cleaned, several stalks of cleaned celery, and a big red bell pepper cleaned and waiting for me on the dining room table, along with a chopping board and a knife he'd sharpened for me! On the island, he had a box of dark brown sugar, the can of pineapple (and a bowl with a strainer next to it), the box of corn starch, soy sauce, a box of chicken broth, and a bottle of cider vinegar! Not bad, huh Beth? He'd really done his homework on reading your description of how you make yours.  Oh, and the wok was on the stove along with the utensils I'd need to make it on the sideboard next to the stove. All I added to the mix was a small can of sliced water chestnuts. We had leftover rice in the fridge, too.

The best is Brian gave ME all the credit for the final dish which was much better than last time since we had pineapple juice this time instead of whatever it was I used as a substitute for it last time (who can remember?). I laughed and said he and Beth really deserved the kudos, not me. It was delicious, Beth, and I thank you again. Making this dish for him every once in a while will ensure I don't have to purchase that orange gooey dish the next time we order Chinese!

Crybaby

avatar
You may remember Brian isn't a potato eater unless they're really crispy, thin (and in most cases overcooked) and covered with cheese but I love potatoes no matter what you do, or don't do to them. It's funny as whenever I see a recipe or a picture of Hasselback potatoes, I think of you, Norm, saying you couldn't stand Elisabeth Hasselback, who I also can't stand.

Anyway, I saw this recipe for a version of Hasselback potatoes in a casserole with cream in them that I might try one day that Brian might eat, especially if I go a little heavier with the cheese. I thought I'd post it for the rest of you to try or at least see.  





Hasselback Russet Potato Gratin
6 to 8 servings. Recipe from finecooking.com

2 Tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 cup heavy cream
2 Tablespoons finely chopped garlic
1 Tablespoon toasted dill seed
1 Tablespoon whole-grain mustard
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3-1/2 lbs. russet potatoes, peeled
Fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup finely grated aged Cheddar (about 1 oz.)
1 to 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill

1. Position a rack in the center of the oven, and heat the oven to 375°F. Coat a 3-quart baking dish with the butter.
2. In a medium bowl, combine the cream, garlic, dill seed, mustard, 1 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper.
3. Cut the tapered ends off the potatoes and discard. Thinly slice the potatoes crosswise into 1/8-inch-thick slices best done with a mandolin. While slicing, sprinkle the potatoes with lemon juice, and arrange them in the baking dish as pictured. Pour the cream mixture over the potatoes, and top with the cheese. Put the gratin on a rimmed baking sheet, and transfer to the oven. Bake until golden brown and bubbling, about 1-1/2 hours.
4. Remove from the oven, and allow to rest for 10 minutes. Top with the dill and serve.

Crybaby

avatar
I saw a column the other day in our local paper from a food writer who just came over twice a month to the paper we now subscribe to from the one we used to get. The older paper, The Times-Picayune, went from publishing 7-days a week to 3 days a week several years ago and though we stayed with it as long as we could, the other paper, publishing for many years in Baton Rouge, had improved its New Orleans edition during that time and the Times-Picayune had gotten worse, often repeating some of Wedneday's columns in Friday's paper. I grew up with parents who got both the morning paper and the evening paper when THAT was still happening so I am addicted to a daily paper. And yes, I can read anything online and still do read some news online but like I am about books, I like holding a daily paper in my hands. I really liked this food writer and even though she retired, she still posted a column a couple times a month which she now moved over to our current paper, The Advocate.

Anyway, her first column contained this recipe, which looks kind of amazing considering how easy it is to make. And yours truly loves the texture of a pound cake so I think it's something we're going to try really soon.

To those of you experienced bakers, what would happen if I used non-fat yogurt (which I always have in the fridge) instead of full-fat Greek yogurt to replace some of that Wesson oil? I think I'm going to give it a try unless you tell me the cake will end up 1-inch high by doing so. Maybe I'll do 3/4 oil and 1/4 non-fat yogurt at first if you think that's safer.

Food Processor Carrot Cake
8 to 10 servings. Recipe from Judy Walker, The Advocate.
This cake is totally made in a food processor and has a fine grain like a pound cake.

4 eggs
1 cup Wesson oil (OR 1/2 cup oil and 1/2 cup full-fat plain Greek yogurt)
2 cups sugar
1 lb. peeled carrots, cut in 1-inch chunks
1 cup pecans
2 cups flour
1 Tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons cinnamon

1. Grease and flour a 10-inch tube pan or Bundt pan. Preheat oven to 400°F.
2. In the bowl of a food processor blend eggs, oil and sugar until smooth. Slowly add carrots through the tube. When they are about half grated, add pecans. When carrots are fully grated, remove lid and add flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon. Replace lid and blend just until dry ingredients are mixed.
3. Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake 30 to 45 minutes, until cake pulls away from edges of the pan and a toothpick inserted in several places in the cake comes out clean. Let cool 5 minutes in the pan, then turn onto a platter to cool completely before icing.

Icing
8 oz. cream cheese
1/2 stick butter (2 oz.), room temperature
1 lb. powdered sugar

Combine cream cheese, butter and powdered sugar in food processor and blend well. Spread or drizzle over cake.

bethk

avatar
Admin
Good Golly Ms. Molly.....er, Michelle ~ how did you know I was just thinking of making that sweet and sour pork? Now you have my mouth drooling for it!

And, yes, the pork tenderloin is the very best I've ever used for it, but when I was growing up we didn't have pork tenderloin. Mom used the least expensive pork steak, cutting off most of the fat, and browned it and then let it simmer for 45 minutes or so until it was tender. So just about any cut of pork will work if you let it cook until tender. To me, the one ingredient that has to be in it is the red pepper. Not so much for the flavor, because green would work just as well, but it just doesn't look right to me if it's not there! LOL

***********

I also saw that Hasselback Gratin recipe ~ and if it didn't make so much I'd probably give it a try. Maybe if we have a community pot luck this winter ~ guess what ingredient I'd leave out ???? LOL

************

I used the last of the butternut squash to make some soup for my lunch. There wasn't much so I simmered a couple chopped carrots, celery & onion in some chicken essence (chicken drippings that are congealed to a gelatin mass without any fat), added the cooked squash and let it all get mushy tender, oh, and seasoned with s&p and freshly grated nutmeg. I ran it through the food mill to smooth it all (I don't own a blender) and just added a tiny bit of chicken stock when I reheated it. I like to add a spoonful of sour cream to stir in just before I eat it. Man, it's one of my favorites for a lunch for one.

I was in a quandry about what to fix for supper, but good friend, Lyn, came to my rescue! She just sent me a text and asked if we'd like to meet them at Ruby Tuesday for an early supper. What kind of friends would we be if we turned them down? Hahahahahaha!

Crybaby

avatar
Yeah, Beth, I didn't think you'd be snagging that Hasselback potato recipe. But you could make it with Parmesan cheese, no? You eat that kind of cheese. I still can't get over that you two don't like leftovers -- I absolutely ADORE cooking but even when I didn't have this back problem and could stand up for any length of time, I would've hated coming home from work and cooking EVERY single night. Plus so often leftovers are so much better than "firsties."

The boneless pork chops we used for the stir-fry, Beth, were center cut pork loin chops. So all the cooking in the world would've just turned them into hockey pucks since they're really made for dry heat and not even for braising. But I browned them quickly in a very hot wok and then threw them back in just long enough for them to get heated up. They were fine though they were a little "harder" when we reheated the dish the next day. Nothing that Brian would ever notice, trust me! I added some red pepper flakes to the dish and some salt and black pepper. When I first tasted it, I though I'd made it a bit too spicy for Brian (the black pepper, not the flakes) but he plowed through it. It tasted less spicy on the reheat I noticed which I hadn't expected. I think I've mentioned that his last two doses of radiation seemed to curtail the amount of heat he could tolerate though he'd been "growing out of it" recently. He laughed and said the other night that his body is going through so many changes with his cancer treatment that nothing surprises him anymore about his taste buds. Poor thing, it just never seems to end for him -- 19 years of battling prostate cancer this spring is a lot to endure. But, of course, he's luckier than most of those he's known who passed away long ago from prostate cancer...

When you guys go to Ruby Tuesday, is that some place contained in your compound or do you have to go outside of your development to get there, Beth? I know how big the development where you live is so I'm just curious. I'll bet given how many people live there that you have tons of retail places, restaurants and other businesses that cater just to those who live in your development.

Niagara Visitor


Those Hasselback potatoes look really, really delicious..................... And the human Elizabeth Hassel.... is Hasselbeck! LOL

Crybaby

avatar
I saw the other day on QVC where they had a special on the KitchenAid Food Grinder attachment was on sale. I've wanted that for ages if only for the sole purpose of grinding jalapeños and bell peppers to make my pepper jelly. As YOU know too well, Beth, the old grinders we use that are supposed to hook onto ones countertop are a pain in the butt. My counter is too thick and so I pull out a wooden cutting board, hook the grinder onto that, and end up putting a bowl on the floor to catch the "drippings" since the board with grinder has to hang over the edge of the counter in order to turn the handle!  It's a mess.  

Well, after reading many reviews both on QVC and those retrieved after a Google search, I read the plastic grinder attachment just didn't hold up. Not only did several people say it cracked while they were using it but some said they used it only on occasion (like we would) but when they took it out to use it, they found it had cracked while being stored!). So after checking out the KitchenAid METAL grinder attachment, which was on sale for $50 off, I took the plunge and bought it. It cost about $30 more than the plabut I got the free shipping I was looking for and the assurance that it would not only last but wouldn't break if we grind meat in it. It came the other day and I have yet to try it. Brian loves "toys" and immediately fell in both toy love and kitchen gadget love with it. He now wants us to grind our own meat for burgers, as we had some delicious burgers a couple of weeks ago from the store and he wants us to make our own. Now that we have the FoodSaver, he said we could do a couple of pounds of meat at one time and freeze packages of two burgers each.

I think I mentioned here we buy these burgers made fresh by the grocery we shop at. Two half-pound burgers cost us 6 bucks and they're soooo good that we think they're a bargain as they're as good as the ones we get at the best burger place in town, Port of Call (plus that's on the edge of the French Quarter and VERY popular). They're easier to eat when that stuff is all INSIDE the already-fat half-pound burger. The burgers we've been buying at Rouse's have cheddar cheese, bacon and jalapeños all GROUND INTO the meat. We cook them on the stovetop griddle and they're the best burgers we've EVER had at home.

The other day I stopped in at another location of the grocery we go to and I wanted a couple of ribeyes cut thicker than the ones in the case. I didn't see anyone in the meat area but I saw they had a specialty seafood showcase in that store so I headed there and saw that they had specialty meat offerings in that showcase as well. While they cut my steaks in the back, I perused the offerings in that case. Not only did they have those specialty burgers in the case, called Bayou Boy Burgers, but THEY had what they called Bayou Boy BRISKET burgers which also had the bacon, cheese and jalapeños in them. We'd been talking at home recently about never having had a burger made with part brisket so I snagged a couple. They were also $5.99/lb. so I paid $7.07 for two burgers weighing a total of 1.18 lbs. These burgers were absolutely delicious and Brian really went nuts over them. So the next time I'm in the store, I'm going to ring the bell behind the meat counter and ask what proportion of brisket to other ground meat they use and if the other meat is ground chuck or ground round, or if they were ALL ground brisket.  Either way, he wants to make our own brisket burgers. I can't help but think a better burger would have a decent percentage of fat so I think they used chuck as well as brisket. Time will tell.

At least the grinder and its attachments (three sizes of grind plates whereas the plastic one only had two) came in a nice storage box so it will be easy to put in the pantry and no parts have to be hunted for. Just have to get another couple of red bell peppers as we used one up in the stir-fry!

I'm going to try to make enough pepper jelly to give as Christmas gifts to all the doctors, nurses and assistants (Brian is treated by a big prostate cancer research department) who treat him for his cancer. Lord knows I've got the canning jars on hand in all sizes. When I was working as a floating legal secretary, one year I made pepper jelly, apple thyme jelly and mint jelly for Christmas gifts. Normally I didn't get into gift-giving at the office but I not only wanted to give gifts to some of the secretaries I helped with overflow work but thought of a way to be able to give several people I worked for and with gifts without spending a fortune. I bought a couple of really pretty lavender baskets made of actual wooden twigs (I STILL have a couple I didn't use) and made a couple of baskets with all three jellies in them (half-pints). But I also just gave a couple of people a pint jar of pepper jelly, which I wrapped in that stiff clear gift paper and tied with ribbons so they looked really pretty at least.

One staff attorney, Erin, who'd tasted my pepper jelly before when she came into my office and I'd brought some for my office mate Susan to try (it's the only recipe I don't give out at the request of the person I harassed into giving it to me!) ran into Susan on the day we were handing out gifts; I'd already given Susan a pint jar of pepper jelly prior to running into Erin. She immediately started in on me, in a teasing manner of course, telling me how lucky Susan was to get a jar of my delicious pepper jelly, that it was soooo good, how she really still wished I'd give her the recipe and how she'd eaten almost half of Susan's jelly right out of the jar I'd just given her. I let her go on for a while and then said, "I guess you haven't been back to your office since you ate almost all of poor Susan's jelly." She took off running toward her office and I heard a loud scream of glee when she got there and found her gift on her chair. I'd purchased a couple of big Weck canning jars and had filled one with pepper jelly just for her, as I felt so bad about not being able to give her the recipe she wanted so badly. Here's a picture of the jar -- it held an entire LITER of jelly!!!






When she ran out to thank me, jar in hand, I laughed and told her I think it would be best if she stayed clear of Susan with that giant jar in her hand since she'd polished off most of Susan's jelly! She immeditely looked around furtively and said she was heading to the kitchen to get a spoon and then would closet herself in her office with the door closed! She said (again) that her boyfriend was a working chef and she'd get him to analyze it so she could recreate it at home. I laughed and told her again that all pepper jelly pretty much had the same ingredients so she should just try any recipe. She sniped that she HAD but her jelly didn't taste like mine.

bethk

avatar
Admin
Yes, the Ruby Tuesday restaurant is inside The Villages....inside "the bubble" as it's often referred to. We have access to over a hundred restaurants that are golf cart accessible, that is, you don't have to have a car to get to. But somehow, we usually decide we want to go to some place a long drive away. The other day Lyn and I went to lunch at a place in Leesburg, which is about 10 miles away. It's now our new "favorite " place. LOL

Crybaby

avatar
bethk wrote:Yes, the Ruby Tuesday restaurant is inside The Villages....inside "the bubble" as it's often referred to.  We have access to over a hundred restaurants that are golf cart accessible, that is, you don't have to have a car to get to.  But somehow, we usually decide we want to go to some place  a long drive away. The other day Lyn and I went to lunch at a place in Leesburg, which is about 10 miles away. It's now our new "favorite " place.  LOL

That's what I thought, Beth, and I thank you for letting me know about the term "inside the bubble." But it's really nice for people who no longer drive, don't have a car or are afraid to go outside the bubble. Many people get more timid as they age especially given the state of society and the crime occurring today all over the U.S. And it's what lots of people bought there for, too, so it's only right. You and Lynn are both still young and healthy enough to not only drive wherever you want but to get around as much as you want. Plus I'll bet sometimes it's nice to go someplace where you don't see someone you know (is that true when you go someplace inside the bubble or is the development so huge that you don't see the same people all the time?). Just as I know that an area such as you live in is not for everyone, I know it's the perfect place for a lot of people for a multitude of reasons. I understand both schools of thought, believe me. At times on this platform other people whose name(s) will go unmentioned have made disparaging remarks about a development such as yours, and even the particular development you live in. I always wrote off those comments as motivated by envy because the sheer volume of people who live there have obviously found it to be the right place for them as do you and Dane and Lyn and her husband.

Thanks for answering my questions, Beth. I know I'm a nosy person!  Embarassed  Embarassed

I'm laughing as every time I mention your heading someplace on your golf cart Brian says how much fun that would be. I always remind him that he'd overbuy at the grocery and wouldn't be able to fit all his groceries on his cart and he laughs. I KNOW I'd be guilty of that!!

Crybaby

avatar
Before I post this, I'm going to say that I'm sure no one including me will ever make this cake but I just had to copy it solely to post here. I was watching Martha Bakes yesterday and was watching her make this ombre-colored pink cake. I'd never make it but it was so darn pretty that I was intrigued as to how she frosted it. At the end she showed she used a petal tip held sideways to frost it and she commented that you would HAVE to have a cake stand that rotated in order to accomplish frosting the cake as she was doing. I didn't even SEE her doing the sides of the cake but she must be a contortionist to not only hold the frosting cone in the correct position while pressing out the same amount of frosting out of the pastry bag the whole time!!

As she was frosting it (she put 1-1/2 cups of frosting between each layer!), I thought, Wow, that must require a heck of a lot of frosting to frost that thing. Right before the end of the segment, she commented, "Did I fail to mention that this frosting used 18 EGG WHITES AND 12 STICKS OF BUTTER?" I almost fainted but I immediately chased down the recipe online and copied a picture of the gorgeous cake so I could show you guys!



Isn't that frosted cake pretty? I'm not so enthralled with the ombre layers but just the sheer beauty of the finished frosted cake! Here's the recipe just in case someone wants it, or just wants to see how much work it is. Or like me, you could always give that photo to a professional baker and get THEM to do it!!

Martha Stewart’s Ombre Strawberry Cake
Makes one 8-inch cake. Recipe from Martha Bakes, Episode 1012.
Talk about pretty in pink! Five different shades of vanilla cake are layered with strawberry jam and rich Swiss meringue buttercream here. The same frosting is piped onto the exterior to look like a rose.

Cake (you need FIVE 8-inch cake pans):
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into Tablespoons,
plus more for pans
3 cups cake flour (not self-rising), plus more for pans
1-1/4 cups whole milk
4 large eggs, room temperature
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1-3/4 cups sugar
1 Tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
Pink gel food color, such as deep pink
1/2 cup seedless strawberry jam
Finely grated zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
Swiss Meringue Buttercream:
4-1/2 cups sugar
18 large egg whites, room temperature
3 pinches of kosher salt
12 sticks (6 cups) unsalted butter, room temperature, cut into Tablespoons
3 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
Pink gel food color, such as deep pink

1. Cake: Preheat oven to 350°F, with racks in upper and lower thirds. Butter five 8-inch round cake pans; line with parchment. Butter parchment, then dust with flour, tapping out excess. Whisk together milk, eggs, and vanilla.
2. In the bowl of a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt on low speed until well combined. Continue beating while gradually adding butter until mixture is crumbly, about 3 minutes.
3. Slowly add half of milk mixture; increase speed to medium and beat until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Slowly add remaining half of milk mixture, scraping down bowl as needed. Beat until incorporated, about 1 minute more. Remove bowl from mixer; divide batter evenly among five bowls (about 1 heaping cup per bowl).
4. Tint four of the bowls with pink food color, starting with a small drop and gradually adding more to each bowl to create a gradient of shades. [On TV, she used four toothpicks which she dipped into the bottle of food coloring, first 1/4 of a toothpick, then 1/2 of a toothpick, 3/4 of a toothpick and then the entire toothpick. As she removed each toothpick from the food coloring, she just put it into a bowl of batter; after each toothpick had been coated and put into a bowl, she dipped the toothpick deep enough into the batter to get all the coloring off the pick, which she then disposed of. She then proceeded to mix the color into the batter. I thought it was a really neat way to ostensibly “measure” very small amounts of food coloring.]
5. Transfer batter from each bowl to one of the prepared pans, spreading to edges with a small offset spatula. Tap pans on counter to release any air bubbles. Bake until a tester inserted in centers comes out clean, about 15 minutes per cake. Transfer pans to wire racks; let cool completely. Turn cakes out of pans and remove parchment. In a small saucepan, heat jam and lemon juice and zest until warm.

1. Swiss Meringue Buttercream: Combine 1-1/2 cups sugar, 6 egg whites, and a pinch of salt in the heatproof bowl of a mixer set over (not in) a pot of simmering water. Whisk until sugar is dissolved and mixture is warm to the touch and feels completely smooth when rubbed between fingertips, 2 to 3 minutes.
2. Transfer bowl to mixer fitted with the whisk attachment; whisk on low speed until foamy. Increase speed to medium-high and whisk until stiff, glossy peaks form and mixture has cooled completely, about 10 minutes. Reduce speed to medium-low; add 4 sticks butter, 2 Tablespoons at a time, whisking until fully incorporated after each addition. (Don't worry if buttercream appears curdled after all of butter has been added; it will become smooth again with beating.) Whisk in 1 teaspoon vanilla.
3. Switch to paddle attachment; beat on low speed until air bubbles are eliminated, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, cover with plastic, and let stand at room temperature. Repeat process twice more with remaining ingredients, using the same amounts each time, then combining all three batches of buttercream in the large bowl and covering with plastic.
4. Add pink food color, a drop at a time, until desired shade of light pink is reached.
5. To assemble cake, place darkest layer, bottom-side down, on an 8-inch cardboard cake round. Using a pastry brush, brush cake with a thin layer of jam mixture; top with 1 cup buttercream, spreading evenly to cover completely. Repeat process with three more layers, stacking darkest to lightest. Finish with lightest cake layer, bottom-side up. Evenly spread top and sides of cake with a 1/2-inch thickness of buttercream, smoothing sides with an offset spatula. Refrigerate until chilled, about 20 minutes.
6. Transfer remaining buttercream to a pastry bag fitted with a large petal tip (such as Wilton #127). Hold bag perpendicular to top of cake, with the wider part of the tip opening at the bottom. Pipe a petal in a circular pattern so that it adheres to top of cake. Simultaneously, rotate cake, and continue piping petals so that the end of each petal overlaps the beginning of the previous petal, until top of cake is covered completely. Next, pipe petals onto sides of cake: hold bag perpendicular to side of cake and pipe around cake, slightly overlapping each layer of frosting as you work from top to bottom of cake to cover completely.

bethk

avatar
Admin
Crybaby wrote:

I'm laughing as every time I mention your heading someplace on your golf cart Brian says how much fun that would be. I always remind him that he'd overbuy at the grocery and wouldn't be able to fit all his groceries on his cart and he laughs. I KNOW I'd be guilty of that!!

Oh, don't worry, Michelle. We have a 'golf cart BAG' that latches on to the back of the golf cart. I can buy $200 worth of groceries and still have room to spare! Hahahahaha!

bethk

avatar
Admin
We had a lovely dinner.....Dane had some sort of chicken and I had a piece of sirloin.  Nothing to write home about.

But the dessert to share was wonderful!  Normally neither one of us orders dessert but it was part of the $24.95/2 dinner special.  We decided on the Peach Melba Tart (as did Lyn & Bill) ~ a freshly baked peach tart, topped with a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream and then thawed frozen raspberries spooned on top.  I wanted to lick the plate!






************

Oh, GEEZE! I forgot Jimmy's gonna be reading this.....

The dessert was crappy.

No good at all.

Wish we wouldn't have forced ourselves to eat it..................

(phew! good save, huh?)

NormM

avatar
I made dinner from a new cookbook. It is the third and fourth recipes from Korean BBQ, which is more fusion than pure Korean. This was Korean al Pastor and gochuchang asparagus. It was raining so I cooked inside.



http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

bethk

avatar
Admin
Love dinner wrapped in a flour tortilla. I've looked at the recipes for the 'al pastor with the pineapple but haven't made them so far. I also ave some gochuchang in the pantry but I haven't opened the container yet. I've got to start using some of the stuff I've got but haven't opened yet.

Crybaby

avatar
bethk wrote:
Crybaby wrote:

I'm laughing as every time I mention your heading someplace on your golf cart Brian says how much fun that would be. I always remind him that he'd overbuy at the grocery and wouldn't be able to fit all his groceries on his cart and he laughs. I KNOW I'd be guilty of that!!

Oh, don't worry, Michelle.  We have a 'golf cart BAG' that latches on to the back of the golf cart.  I can buy $200 worth of groceries and still have room to spare!  Hahahahaha!


We're both over here saying YAHOO to your golf bag, Beth!! Now we BOTH want to go to the store in a golf cart! As it is, Brian uses the electric glider with the little cart when he goes to Rouse's. He always wants me to use one when I go there and I tell him I won't use that thing until I have no choice but to use it. He wants his friend or my late sister's husband to come with him to the grocery and get on one so they can race through the store, which only makes ME think of litigation. I'm okay just having the cart to lean on as I mosey through the store. Plus I'd fill up that little basket too fast! But by the time I finish grocery shopping, it's pure hell to have to actually empty the cart. I always get help getting it out to the car and put into my trunk, though, but I sure wish I could tip someone to get it out of the cart onto the checkout counter, though I'm sure I could ask for it if I wanted. Clerks have already told me the store will get someone to come through the store and get things off the shelf for me if it would make it easier. That's a sweet offer but it would just make me feel like more of an invalid. I just stay too long and buy too much each time I go. I should wear blinders when I go in to "get a few things."

Crybaby

avatar
Your dessert sounds delicious, Beth. No need to apologize to Jimmy after I went and posted a cake!  But it was just to show you guys the ICING. Remember that, Jimmy. None of us are ever going to make that cake.

Norm, your dinner, whether you call it Korean or Korean fusion, was right up my alley. Everything looked delicious but your meals always do. I just love the variety of food you make. You've never cooked a single dish that I wouldn't try either.

Laughed, Beth, as I too have a container of gochuchang that is also unopened. It won't remain in that state long. I want to try adding some of it to the Korean BBQ Sauce to spice it up. I've added sambal oelek to it before but thought maybe the gochuchang added to it would result in a nicer texture. And yeah, I know I can just add Tabasco or sriracha to it which wouldn't change its texture but I needed another reason to buy some gochuchang, which I already wanted!!

But like Brian always says, anything spent on kitchen equipment or kitchen ingredients is money well spent! So at least I don't have to answer any questions when I buy all sorts of stuff other than, "Ohh, what're you going to make with THAT?" which is a question I can easily live with.  clown

Crybaby

avatar
NormM wrote:I made dinner from a new cookbook. It is the third and fourth recipes from Korean BBQ, which is more fusion than pure Korean. This was Korean al Pastor and gochuchang asparagus.  It was raining so I cooked inside.






Too good looking to let pass without a "reprint," as I'm sure everyone would agree. Was that grilled pineapple rings that you sliced up, Norm? I'll say it again: Charlie is one lucky man!

NormM

avatar
Yes. I grilled the asparagus, pineapple and the pork shoulder. I did them all inside because it was raining outside. I am going to have a chore cleaning that cast iron griddle tomorrow.

http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

Bugster2

avatar
I made a recipe from Fine Cooking called Potato chip crusted cod with tarragon mustard aioli. It wasn't bad. We will repeat it.

My BIL called to tell us that at 7:21PM, SpaceX was launching a rocket out of Vandenburg AFB. We walked outside just in time to see it launch (VAB is at least 200 miles away). It was spectacular. So glad I didn't miss it. I have always seen the rainbow contrails from a launch but never the launch itself. The light kept expanding till it almost covered the sky. Katie has a pic. I will see if I can post it.

I finally finished the 14 seat cushions. Amen! They look ok, not pro but ok.
Can't get my mind off of Jimmy. I don't think he will be shoveling snow this winter.
Joe had a couple of stiff drinks before dinner and went swimming in 68 degree water. The drinks must have made him numb.

Bugster2

avatar


Here is a launch picture. Wish it was better.

bethk

avatar
Admin
Bugster2 wrote:

Here is a launch picture. Wish it was better.

Cool! Neat that it lit up the sky.

Niagara Visitor


Turkey is in the oven.  Stuffed, but I over-estimated the cavity, and underestimated the amount of stuffing I made, so there's an extra dish.  Rabbits are ready to go into their "new home".  They were a bit of a challenge.  Whatever butcher did these, basically skinned, removed the head and guts, and left the rest attached inside!  I was used to hubby giving me the innards in a separate bag/dish.  

I bought a new, bright yellow 18x24 inch plastic cutting board the other day, and don't know how I managed to prepare rabbits before.  My meat cleaver as well as my kitchen shears got a good workout!

Red cabbage is defrosting, it will go in the slow cooker for re-heating and serving. There are still potatoes to peel, other veggies to get ready for roasting, then get ready for guests.  I hope everyone is hungry when they come, and that they bring containers for leftovers!

Bugster2

avatar
I am sure your Thanksgiving will be wonderful.

Sponsored content


Back to top  Message [Page 2 of 11]

Go to page : Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 9, 10, 11  Next

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum