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OCTOBER, 2018 - What's cooking for dinner / supper?

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Crybaby

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Bugster2 wrote:I just found out that Griffith Observatory says it was probably a meteor burning up in the sky. It was seen from Los Angeles all the way down here. Some people caught it on their dash cams. It was much closer to me. It seemed like it was directly overhead.


Cool!

Crybaby

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UNCLE JIMMY wrote:Went for my lung C/T scan today. It was a funny experience. Poor Tina grabbed out of the 20 wheel chairs at the entrance, the one with the missing foot rests, and the one with the wobbly front caster wheels. Here she is, trying to push me through the doorways, and the wheels twisted and got stuck. I had to get up and walk till she got the wheelchair over the obstruction.

Kind of like the bad cart I always seem to pick up at the grocery, Jimmy!! We went inside a Walmart recently together just to place an order for an expensive drug Brian was prescribed. We each took a cart inside as it's easier for both of us to have something to lean on while standing for a good bit. Not only did I manage to get one with wonky wheels but it made screeching noises after you pushed it for a while. He kept making me laugh by trying to get away from me and then looking back at me like I was some annoying crazy lady. I guess the lady behind the counter was watching us because she howled when we stepped up (to the wrong window of course) and after she said, "Are you two together?" I responded "Not for long."

Re the wheelchair, we never have that much of a selection of wheelchairs when we're needing one for one of us -- the only one available is usually a lemon!

bethk

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Admin
Lore, does the quince remind you of any other fruit? Since I've not had it I wondered if it resembled a combination of other fruit flavors.

Niagara Visitor


I might be tempted to try tart apples and some turnip.  Increase the amount of ginger and cloves.  THat could be interesting.
Maybe add some grapefruit zest or actual fruit.  Quince is a unique flavour.

Crybaby

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Jimmy, you had quite a crowd for those birthday celebrations -- Happy Birthday a little late!


Re jarred marinara, we just don't seem to like the flavor of any of them we've tried. It's too easy to make marinara and it's really good with San Marzano tomatoes, too, whether you're just making a marinara or a full-fledged sauce. I don't like using crushed tomatoes in either, as I find they make the sauce too icky thick. We like the texture of whole tomatoes and the liquid they're packed in; I usually smash the whole tomato with my hands as I add them to the pot, or sometimes grab a potato-masher if I want smaller pieces of tomato in it. I'd really like to find a jarred marinara we liked for the convenience factor but we stopped trying years ago. I couldn't help but be curious about what kind Ina Garten uses, though, so if any of you have her cookbook where she divulges "her" brand, please let me know.

Brian made dinner for me yesterday! He defrosted and trimmed a pork tenderloin and rubbed them with brown sugar, Kosher salt, paprika and cayenne. Then he wrapped each tenderloin in bacon, seared them in a cast-iron skillet, mopped them with a mixture of apricot preserves and Zatarain's whole grain mustard and finished them in the oven, which only took a short while as we take them out at 140°F. We had leftover pork fried rice on the side and we still had some canned whole cranberry sauce we'd gotten to have with the turkey breast we cooked. Made a perfect side, along with some of the apricot/mustard sauce on the pork. It was delicious and he really did a wonderful job -- asked me some questions prior to beginning and then he needed no help while cooking. Just called me to come enjoy dinner while the pork tenderloin was resting! Leftovers today that we'll both enjoy.


I'm looking forward to Thanksgiving (my favorite holiday!). We both laughed at how spoiled we are by having our homemade orange cranberry sauce for so many years now after cracking open a can of the whole berry stuff -- it tasted bland compared to what we're used to. We really mixed the complexity of our sauce, and that Cognac we add seems to keep the stuff good in our fridge for ages. I usually pick up 4 to 6 bags of fresh cranberries in season so I can replace the ones in the freezer with fresh ones. It's nice having the fresh ones available during the year and it's even better that they don't need defrosting to be used.

Last week I went out and I could tell Brian needed something to do. I suggested he make some bacon so I could make club sandwiches with the turkey breast we'd made when I came home. We didn't have any tomatoes so I used the canned whole berry cranberry sauce as the moistener instead of sliced tomato and it really was a delicious sandwich.


Crybaby

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bethk wrote:I've been hungry for pork steak and finally found it on sale.  (I'm SO cheep!)

Instead of being boneless, which is what I usually find, these were called 'pork sirloin steak'.  Boy the bone-in makes a huge difference in flavor.  


We like the bone-in kind, too, Beth.


Your baked potato looked good to me. I'm going to have to pick up a couple of nice potatoes for baking, as I haven't had one in ages. I like the crispy skin too -- the best part!

Bugster2

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Niagara Visitor wrote:
Bugster2 wrote:I have been trying to identify a fruit tree in my yard. I finally joined a garden forum and what I was told is that it is quince. Have any of you ever cooked and eaten quince? What did you think? I have never eaten the fruit and understand it must be cooked.
I had a quince tree on our farm.  In our area of Niagara, they turned a bright yellow in mid October.  I love, love, love the fragrance of the fruit, and have made dozens, if not hundreds of jars of quince jelly/jam.  It is very high in pectin and for that, you don't have to add any extra pectin.  

I have used them in combination with red and hot pepper to make fabulous red pepper jelly. 

I made something called "Spoon Sweet" a recipe I found in I think one of  Julie Rosso's cookbooks.  Use it similarly to a chutney.  I'll see if I can find the recipe and post it here.


We had Greek guests one year, and they said that if the fruit is very ripe, they eat it raw.  

We never sprayed any of our trees, so mine were sometimes quite wormy, and cutting them was very labour intensive.  I did not peel them, but scrubbed with a stiff vegetable brush, then put in a big pasta pot with the strainer, covered with water and then boiled them until very soft.  I used my potato masher to get lots of the pulp into the liquid, so my jelly was always cloudy.  I suppose I could have strained it through a cheesecloth, but the flavour was fabulous, so why do the work was my thought.  

My B&B guests often said "OH, quince jelly, my mother used to make that".  I have one jar of the jelly left and I am hoarding it.  Quince are not readily available in stores here, I have only seen them once in one particular store.  My whole house smelled wonderful at quince time.  If they made a candle with that scent, I'd be burning it all the time!

I hope you enjoy your quince. Apparently they are a native North American tree.

P.S.  I found it, but it's in Sheila Lukins All Around the world cookbook. Page 512

About 3 pounds of quinces, quartered, peeled and cored
Juice and finely grated zest of 2 lemons
3 cups water
2 cups sugar
1 inch fresh, peeled ginger
2 cinnamon sticks
4 whole cloves


1. place quinces in large, heavy non-reactive pot with the lemon juice, zest, and water. 
Add the sugar, ginger, cinnamon sticks and cloves.  Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer and simmer until fruit is tender and the colour has changed to pale orange.
2 Cool to room temperature, remove cinnamon, ginger and cloves. Store covered in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

*************************************************************

I had quite a bit of fruit, so I processed in a hot water bath in mason jars. Mine was quite chunky and we used it as a topping for meats like chicken or pork.

Is this what your quince looked like?

Bugster2

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From what I have read, quince must be cooked. I also read it had a wonderful scent. This fruit is the only one and it broke off when I was trying to get a picture of it. Fortunately there are more blossoms and some look like they are producing fruit.

Thank you for the recipe. I will print off your post. I always like trying new foods, within reason of course. This falls into this category. stinky tofu does not. LOL.

Niagara Visitor


Bugster2 wrote:
Niagara Visitor wrote:
Bugster2 wrote:I have been trying to identify a fruit tree in my yard. I finally joined a garden forum and what I was told is that it is quince. Have any of you ever cooked and eaten quince? What did you think? I have never eaten the fruit and understand it must be cooked.
I had a quince tree on our farm.  In our area of Niagara, they turned a bright yellow in mid October.  I love, love, love the fragrance of the fruit, and have made dozens, if not hundreds of jars of quince jelly/jam.  It is very high in pectin and for that, you don't have to add any extra pectin.  

I have used them in combination with red and hot pepper to make fabulous red pepper jelly. 

I made something called "Spoon Sweet" a recipe I found in I think one of  Julie Rosso's cookbooks.  Use it similarly to a chutney.  I'll see if I can find the recipe and post it here.


We had Greek guests one year, and they said that if the fruit is very ripe, they eat it raw.  

We never sprayed any of our trees, so mine were sometimes quite wormy, and cutting them was very labour intensive.  I did not peel them, but scrubbed with a stiff vegetable brush, then put in a big pasta pot with the strainer, covered with water and then boiled them until very soft.  I used my potato masher to get lots of the pulp into the liquid, so my jelly was always cloudy.  I suppose I could have strained it through a cheesecloth, but the flavour was fabulous, so why do the work was my thought.  

My B&B guests often said "OH, quince jelly, my mother used to make that".  I have one jar of the jelly left and I am hoarding it.  Quince are not readily available in stores here, I have only seen them once in one particular store.  My whole house smelled wonderful at quince time.  If they made a candle with that scent, I'd be burning it all the time!

I hope you enjoy your quince. Apparently they are a native North American tree.

P.S.  I found it, but it's in Sheila Lukins All Around the world cookbook. Page 512

About 3 pounds of quinces, quartered, peeled and cored
Juice and finely grated zest of 2 lemons
3 cups water
2 cups sugar
1 inch fresh, peeled ginger
2 cinnamon sticks
4 whole cloves


1. place quinces in large, heavy non-reactive pot with the lemon juice, zest, and water. 
Add the sugar, ginger, cinnamon sticks and cloves.  Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer and simmer until fruit is tender and the colour has changed to pale orange.
2 Cool to room temperature, remove cinnamon, ginger and cloves. Store covered in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

*************************************************************

I had quite a bit of fruit, so I processed in a hot water bath in mason jars. Mine was quite chunky and we used it as a topping for meats like chicken or pork.

Is this what your quince looked like?

This is the quince I know.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=quince&rlz=1C1GGRV_enCA751CA751&oq=quince&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.4058j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

bethk

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Admin
Debbie ~ your fruit looks like the shape in the pics Lore linked....wondering if it will 'ripen' up, maybe be able to cook down just that one to see if you like the taste if it ripens after coming off the tree. Cool!

***************************

Supper was a grilled rib eye (inexpensive and, quite honestly, worth what I paid for them.....) There was a lot of gristle but the flavor wasn't bad. I don't know where I'm going to find another bag of the hardwood charcoal ~ I haven't seen it since 'summer'. All I see now is the Kingsford briquettes and I don't like the flavor nearly as well as the hardwood. I'm such a fussy griller.....




Bugster2

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bethk wrote:Debbie ~ your fruit looks like the shape in the pics Lore linked....wondering if it will 'ripen' up, maybe be able to cook down just that one to see if you like the taste if it ripens after coming off the tree.  Cool!

***************************

Supper was a grilled rib eye (inexpensive and, quite honestly, worth what I paid for them.....) There was a lot of gristle but the flavor wasn't bad.  I don't know where I'm going to find another bag of the hardwood charcoal ~ I haven't seen it since 'summer'.  All I see now is the Kingsford briquettes and I don't like the flavor nearly as well as the hardwood.  I'm such a fussy griller.....





I didn't see any links. It is probably staring me right in the face.

Found it. IDK. Right now mine is hard, green, with a slight blush at the top. I am going to live with it and when it starts to go bad I will cut it open and look at its' innards.

NormM

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We had Cornish hens marinated and basted with orange juice, honey and soy sauce. Some of the marinade was reserved, thickened and served with it at the table.

http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

UNCLE JIMMY

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Had a baked chicken done in the oven. Carrots and celery, and asparagus No starches. Meatballs in tomato sauce we did all night on the slow cooker on low.
Just the meat; and no bread. ........ but, two cookies that DD baked for dessert.

A little later, I will have a yogurt as a bedtime snack.

UNCLE JIMMY

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Crybaby wrote:Jimmy, you had quite a crowd for those birthday celebrations -- Happy Birthday a little late!


Re jarred marinara, we just don't seem to like the flavor of any of them we've tried. It's too easy to make marinara and it's really good with San Marzano tomatoes, too, whether you're just making a marinara or a full-fledged sauce. I don't like using crushed tomatoes in either, as I find they make the sauce too icky thick. We like the texture of whole tomatoes and the liquid they're packed in; I usually smash the whole tomato with my hands as I add them to the pot, or sometimes grab a potato-masher if I want smaller pieces of tomato in it. I'd really like to find a jarred marinara we liked for the convenience factor but we stopped trying years ago. I couldn't help but be curious about what kind Ina Garten uses, though, so if any of you have her cookbook where she divulges "her" brand, please let me know.

Brian made dinner for me yesterday! He defrosted and trimmed a pork tenderloin and rubbed them with brown sugar, Kosher salt, paprika and cayenne. Then he wrapped each tenderloin in bacon, seared them in a cast-iron skillet, mopped them with a mixture of apricot preserves and Zatarain's whole grain mustard and finished them in the oven, which only took a short while as we take them out at 140°F. We had leftover pork fried rice on the side and we still had some canned whole cranberry sauce we'd gotten to have with the turkey breast we cooked. Made a perfect side, along with some of the apricot/mustard sauce on the pork. It was delicious and he really did a wonderful job -- asked me some questions prior to beginning and then he needed no help while cooking. Just called me to come enjoy dinner while the pork tenderloin was resting! Leftovers today that we'll both enjoy.


I'm looking forward to Thanksgiving (my favorite holiday!). We both laughed at how spoiled we are by having our homemade orange cranberry sauce for so many years now after cracking open a can of the whole berry stuff -- it tasted bland compared to what we're used to. We really mixed the complexity of our sauce, and that Cognac we add seems to keep the stuff good in our fridge for ages. I usually pick up 4 to 6 bags of fresh cranberries in season so I can replace the ones in the freezer with fresh ones. It's nice having the fresh ones available during the year and it's even better that they don't need defrosting to be used.

Last week I went out and I could tell Brian needed something to do. I suggested he make some bacon so I could make club sandwiches with the turkey breast we'd made when I came home. We didn't have any tomatoes so I used the canned whole berry cranberry sauce as the moistener instead of sliced tomato and it really was a delicious sandwich.


Thank you Michelle. The way it could have been, was, I could have skipped this birthday and I would have been bye bye ! Hahahahaha.

The Marzano tomatoes are tops. We get them in the huge jumbo 1/2 gallon cans. I seed them and puree them for sauce making ...

bethk

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Admin
I spatchcocked a chicken this morning and put it on the gas grill. We end up eating the dark meat and wings and leave the breast for another meal. Not sure what I'll do with it.

I just made the vegetable spaghetti (carrot, onion, green & yellow zucchini) for a side.




I saw a recipe on Facebook that I hadn't made in years....apple cake. It's one of those super easy, one-bowl-just-mix-with-a-spoon recipes that takes you back to when you were a kid and Grandma baked for dessert. I even threw together some cream cheese frosting to just send me over the edge!


Bugster2

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I love home-made cream cheese frosting. Can't keep my fingers out of it.

No dinner tonight. Joe and I had sandwiches this afternoon. Katie is coming back from being out of town and so we were on our own.

NormM

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We had poblanos roasted with cheese and shrimp and served on top of a red bell pepper sauce.

http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

UNCLE JIMMY

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NormM wrote:We had poblanos roasted with cheese and shrimp and served on top of a red bell pepper sauce.
Nice Norm! Your creation??

UNCLE JIMMY

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bethk wrote:I spatchcocked a chicken this morning and put it on the gas grill.  We end up eating the dark meat and wings and leave the breast for another meal.  Not sure what I'll do with it.

I just made the vegetable spaghetti (carrot, onion, green & yellow zucchini) for a side.


 

I saw a recipe on Facebook that I hadn't made in years....apple cake.  It's one of those super easy, one-bowl-just-mix-with-a-spoon recipes that takes you back to when you were a kid and Grandma baked for dessert.  I even threw together some cream cheese frosting to just send me over the edge!



The cake has me drooling. Mom used to make a spice cake / loaf with that icing. O M G ! Sooooo Good!

NormM

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No Jimmy. It was a recipe from Bon Appitit from 2002.

http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

UNCLE JIMMY

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Had sort of a celebration meal for Lunch & supper.
Had some good news this afternoon. My lung CT scans showed no cancer or growth mass.
The cardiologist said for me to stay on the medicine for the lungs, and rest, with oxygen at all times. Lose more Weight.....and I can possibly mend myself.

Lunch was a small toasted bagel, with fried low sodium ham, and egg and cheese.
Supper was a lean burger on a low carb bun. Just a wipe of ketchup to taste it.
Low sugar peaches over cottage cheese for dessert.

Bugster2

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UNCLE JIMMY wrote:Had sort of a celebration meal for Lunch & supper.
Had some good news this afternoon. My lung CT scans showed no cancer or growth mass.
The cardiologist said for me to stay on the medicine for the lungs, and rest, with oxygen at all times.  Lose more Weight.....and I can possibly mend myself.

Lunch was a small toasted bagel, with fried low sodium ham, and egg and cheese.
Supper was a lean burger on a low carb bun. Just a wipe of ketchup to taste it.
Low sugar peaches over cottage cheese for dessert.

I have a friend who cured herself of diabetes just by losing weight so I think you have a good chance of getting a lot better if you do the same. It won't be fun but at least you are a man and the weight will come off faster than if you were a woman.

UNCLE JIMMY

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Forgot to mention. DD made ice cream in the new electric ice cream machine I bought but never used yet.....
The ice cream was chocolate from cocoa powder, coconut milk, and peanut butter powder. One banana for sweetness. It was so good. It took 45 minutes to freeze, and 2 hours to cure in the freezer.

UNCLE JIMMY

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Bugster2 wrote:
UNCLE JIMMY wrote:Had sort of a celebration meal for Lunch & supper.
Had some good news this afternoon. My lung CT scans showed no cancer or growth mass.
The cardiologist said for me to stay on the medicine for the lungs, and rest, with oxygen at all times.  Lose more Weight.....and I can possibly mend myself.

Lunch was a small toasted bagel, with fried low sodium ham, and egg and cheese.
Supper was a lean burger on a low carb bun. Just a wipe of ketchup to taste it.
Low sugar peaches over cottage cheese for dessert.

I have a friend who cured herself of diabetes just by losing weight so I think you have a good chance of getting a lot better if you do the same. It won't be fun but at least you are a man and the weight will come off faster than if you were a woman.

I think you are 100% correct Deb. Thanks!

bethk

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Admin
Dane's been on his COPD meds for around 5 or 6 years....and he lost all excess weight.

The only time he's had to use his rescue inhaler was when we were up North and the humidity was so much different from what he's use to here now. His breathing has improved a whole lot.

So I know you can do it, too, Jimmy. It's a long process but the rewards are great! Go for it!

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