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Newbie from Wisconsin!

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1 Newbie from Wisconsin! on Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:30 pm

1DomesticGoddess

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Hello everyone, I'm Cindi, I'm 61, married 39 years, have 3 grown daughters, and 1 granddaughter (who I absolutely adore). I enjoy cooking, baking, collecting cookbooks, sharing recipes with others, reading about the paranormal, and spending time with my family. I look forward to being a member of this forum, and getting to know others as well.

2 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Sun Aug 07, 2016 8:31 pm

bethk

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Welcome, Cindi! Please jump into the conversations ~ we look forward to getting to know you. I hope you've had a chance to get to know us by seeing our forum for a while.

I'm Beth ~ I live in The Villages, Florida (a retirement community), transplanted from northwest Ohio.

How's your weather in Wisconsin this time of the year? This is the hottest summer I've experienced in Florida since we moved here in 2012, although yesterday and today we are getting a reprieve from the high 90's and it's been a balmy 85° with a breeze most of the day ~ I was tempted to open the doors but decided I didn't want to cut off the a/c quite yet. LOL

3 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Sun Aug 07, 2016 9:24 pm

UNCLE JIMMY

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1DomesticGoddess wrote:Hello everyone, I'm Cindi, I'm 61, married 39 years, have 3 grown daughters, and 1 granddaughter (who I absolutely adore). I enjoy cooking, baking, collecting cookbooks, sharing recipes with others, reading about the paranormal, and spending time with my family. I look forward to being a member of this forum, and getting to know others as well.

Hi Cindy...
It's Embryodad from NCT forum.
Great to see you here. This is a nice small friendly / quiet / forum.
As you can see, there is nothing formal here. We talk about many things, and intertwine them even in What's Cooking Today Thread (s).

Feel free to just jump in anywhere, and looking forward to seeing some of your recipes.
Take Care..... God Bless!

"Jimmy"

4 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 08, 2016 3:31 am

1DomesticGoddess

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bethk wrote:Welcome, Cindi! I'm Beth ~ I live in The Villages, Florida (a retirement community), transplanted from northwest Ohio.  

How's your weather in Wisconsin this time of the year?  This is the hottest summer I've experienced in Florida since we moved here in 2012, although yesterday and today we are getting a reprieve from the high 90's and it's been a balmy 85° with a breeze most of the day ~ I was tempted to open the doors but decided I didn't want to cut off the a/c quite yet.  LOL

Hi Beth, it's so nice to meet you!  Our family resides in the central part of Wisconsin, and in the country. Weather in Wisconsin is pretty much like everywhere else, hot, humid, and temps in the 80's.  I am so looking forward to Fall being here, as I prefer the cooler temps.  Anything above 65º, is just too warm for me.


UNCLE JIMMY wrote:Hi Cindy...It's Embryodad from NCT forum.  Great to see you here.  This is a nice small friendly / quiet / forum.  As you can see, there is nothing formal here.  We talk about many things, and intertwine them even in What's Cooking Today Thread (s).

Feel free to just jump in anywhere, and looking forward to seeing some of your recipes.
Take Care..... God Bless!

"Jimmy"


Oh my goodness Embryodad, it's nice to see you are a member of this forum!  Jimmy, I always enjoy reading your posts at NCT forum, and I'm definitely looking forward to viewing them here as well.



Last edited by 1DomesticGoddess on Mon Aug 08, 2016 12:05 pm; edited 1 time in total

5 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 08, 2016 8:36 am

Crybaby

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Hi Cindi, and welcome to Cooking Friends. It's really nice to see a new member join us.

I'm Michelle, and my husband and I live in New Orleans. We're retired (I'm 62 and Brian is 69) and we have no kids, just one cat. We love N.O. and are enduring the heat this summer, with July 2016 being the hottest July on record. I, too, love cooler weather though Brian, originally from Cape Cod, adores warm weather, and is one who's always cheering when summer rolls around.

I've been cooking since I was a young girl, as my mom went back to work when I started school, but am just sticking my toe into the baking world, with Beth helping most of the way!

Love that you collect cookbooks. Do you have a favorite or two? I've got a lot of them, with one of my all-time favorites being "The New Basics" by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins.

Am curious, too, to know what the NCT forum is...

Again, welcome to this forum. It's a very nice place to be and I hope you like it here as much as the rest of us do.

6 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 08, 2016 8:40 am

NormM

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Hi Cindi. Welcome. I am a retired school teacher.

http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

7 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 08, 2016 1:08 pm

1DomesticGoddess

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Crybaby wrote:Hi Cindi, and welcome to Cooking Friends.  It's really nice to see a new member join us.

I've been cooking since I was a young girl, as my mom went back to work when I started school, but am just sticking my toe into the baking world, with Beth helping most of the way!  

Love that you collect cookbooks.  Do you have a favorite or two?

Again, welcome to this forum.  It's a very nice place to be and I hope you like it here as much as the rest of us do.


Hi Michelle, it's nice to meet you too, and thank you for welcoming me to the forum!  I'm sure I'll enjoy being a member here!

I too, started cooking at a young age (about 10), but I only cooked when no one was around, as my mother wouldn't allow my sisters and I in the kitchen when she/herself was cooking.  

Michelle, regarding the cookbooks, my 3 favorite cookbooks which I'll always treasure are...

1973 Betty Crocker's Cookbook

1976 A Campbell Cookbook Cooking with Soup

1979 Pillsbury Kitchens' Cookbook



NormM wrote:Hi Cindi.  Welcome.  I am a retired school teacher.

Hello Norm, it's nice to meet you as well. Thank you for welcoming me to the forum!

8 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Aug 09, 2016 9:35 am

Crybaby

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1DomesticGoddess wrote:I too, started cooking at a young age (about 10), but I only cooked when no one was around, as my mother wouldn't allow my sisters and I in the kitchen when she/herself was cooking.

That's really cute -- did she know you were experimenting in there?

I started out helping my mom in the kitchen and then, around the age of 8, I began to "start" dinner for her so some stuff would be done when she got home from work, about 5:30 p.m.  By then, we were what is now referred to as latchkey kids, I guess, but we actually listened to the rules in place for us when we came home, including finishing our homework.  At first, I'd do things like chop onions or celery, and after a while, she'd trust me to season a roast and begin browning it in the oven!  I used to be sooo proud of myself back then.  

My father used to buy us each magazines (I had an older sister and brother but there are only 3 years between oldest and youngest) and I'd always opt for the cooking magazines.  I think that helped me develop a real love of cooking and food, too.  My dad cooked too -- short order type stuff most of the time, but also meatloaf and the occasional roast.  He was a decent cook but not as good as my born-in-Louisiana mom, that's for sure. But he sure enjoyed good food. When I started cooking, he'd run all over town to get me the "best" Italian sausage and the best imported cheeses (when I first made lasagna, something my French Creole-cooking mom never made). He definitely helped my fledgling efforts taste a lot better than they probably deserved at the time. Often wish he was still alive so he could see what a good cook I am now (he died in 1979 at 61) -- I often wonder what I'd cook for him if it could only be one meal. Anyone else ever do that?

1DomesticGoddess wrote:Michelle, regarding the cookbooks, my 3 favorite cookbooks which I'll always treasure are...

1973 Betty Crocker's Cookbook

1976 A Campbell Cookbook Cooking with Soup

1979 Pillsbury Kitchens' Cookbook

Sticking with the oldies but goodies, I see, Cindi!  Have to say I'm not familiar with any of those, though I've heard of two of them.  I only have one cookbook that my mom had (she didn't have but a couple) and it's an old Better Homes & Gardens cookbook from the war years, which followed the depression -- there are recipes in there using ingredients that weren't plentiful, like sugar and butter.  It's the only cookbook I ever saw her looking at...

9 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Aug 09, 2016 11:51 am

NormM

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The only cookbook my mom ever had was bought the year after I was born. It was a Watkins cookbook. Watkins used to sell herbs and spices door-to-door like the Fuller Brush Man. I never knew of a recipe from the cookbook that she used but it was twice as big as it should be because it was stuffed full of recipes she got from friends or cut out of magazines.

http://r2j1cp@gmail.com

10 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Sun Aug 14, 2016 6:03 pm

1DomesticGoddess

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Crybaby wrote:
1DomesticGoddess wrote:I too, started cooking at a young age (about 10), but I only cooked when no one was around, as my mother wouldn't allow my sisters and I in the kitchen when she/herself was cooking.

That's really cute -- did she know you were experimenting in there?
No, she did not! I don't think she ever suspected!


I started out helping my mom in the kitchen and then, around the age of 8, I began to "start" dinner for her so some stuff would be done when she got home from work, about 5:30 p.m.  By then, we were what is now referred to as latchkey kids, I guess, but we actually listened to the rules in place for us when we came home, including finishing our homework.  At first, I'd do things like chop onions or celery, and after a while, she'd trust me to season a roast and begin browning it in the oven!  I used to be sooo proud of myself back then. You should be proud of yourself, Michelle. That's quite an accomplishment at such a young age! 

My father used to buy us each magazines (I had an older sister and brother but there are only 3 years between oldest and youngest) and I'd always opt for the cooking magazines.  I think that helped me develop a real love of cooking and food, too.  My dad cooked too -- short order type stuff most of the time, but also meatloaf and the occasional roast.  He was a decent cook but not as good as my born-in-Louisiana mom, that's for sure.  But he sure enjoyed good food.  When I started cooking, he'd run all over town to get me the "best" Italian sausage and the best imported cheeses (when I first made lasagna, something my French Creole-cooking mom never made).  He definitely helped my fledgling efforts taste a lot better than they probably deserved at the time. Often wish he was still alive so he could see what a good cook I am now (he died in 1979 at 61) -- Michelle, I'm so sorry to hear your father is no longer here! I often wonder what I'd cook for him if it could only be one meal. Anyone else ever do that?

1DomesticGoddess wrote:Michelle, regarding the cookbooks, my 3 favorite cookbooks which I'll always treasure are...

1973 Betty Crocker's Cookbook

1976 A Campbell Cookbook Cooking with Soup

1979 Pillsbury Kitchens' Cookbook

Sticking with the oldies but goodies, I see, Cindi!  Have to say I'm not familiar with any of those, though I've heard of two of them.  I only have one cookbook that my mom had (she didn't have but a couple) and it's an old Better Homes & Gardens cookbook from the war years, which followed the depression  -- there are recipes in there using ingredients that weren't plentiful, like sugar and butter.  It's the only cookbook I ever saw her looking at...

Michelle, I don't think my mother never had or used a cookbook. If she did, I never saw it. When I was in high school, I had purchased the 1973 Betty Crocker's Cookbook for my mother for Mother's Day. When I was a young bride, I purchased the same cookbook (but in paper back). It was actually my very first cookbook, and I got a lot of use out of it.  Years later, my oldest daughter helped me order the same cookbook (the hard cover back) cookbook online on e-bay. Needless to say, it was also the most expensive cookbook I own, but I'll always treasure that cookbook. My oldest daughter herself, ordered the same cookbook online.  Not that she'd ever use it, as she doesn't care to cook, but I think she ordered it for sentimental reasons.

11 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Sun Aug 14, 2016 6:18 pm

1DomesticGoddess

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NormM wrote:The only cookbook my mom ever had was bought the year after I was born. It was a Watkins cookbook. Watkins used to sell herbs and spices door-to-door like the Fuller Brush Man. I never knew of a recipe from the cookbook that she used but it was twice as big as it should be because it was stuffed full of recipes she got from friends or cut out of magazines.

Norm, I remember my mother purchasing items from the Fuller Brush Man when I was just a youngster.

12 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Sun Aug 14, 2016 6:39 pm

Crybaby

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DomesticGoddess wrote:Michelle, I don't think my mother never had or used a cookbook. If she did, I never saw it. When I was in high school, I had purchased the 1973 Betty Crocker's Cookbook for my mother for Mother's Day. When I was a young bride, I purchased the same cookbook (but in paper back). It was actually my very first cookbook, and I got a lot of use out of it. Years later, my oldest daughter helped me order the same cookbook (the hard cover back) cookbook online on e-bay. Needless to say, it was also the most expensive cookbook I own, but I'll always treasure that cookbook. My oldest daughter herself, ordered the same cookbook online. Not that she'd ever use it, as she doesn't care to cook, but I think she ordered it for sentimental reasons.

That's sweet, Cindi. I don't blame you for getting that cookbook in hardback; it has such good memories for you. And it was even sweeter that your non-cooking daughter wanted her own copy, too! Do you know what ever became of your mom's copy?

My mom was a very good cook but cooked food indigenous to Louisiana. She told me when she first married my father, she looked up recipes for "Yankee" food she could make for him -- one meal she remembered making was a "New England Boiled Dinner." One night, she said "the hell with it" and made a local Louisiana dish (I think she made boulettes, little meatballs made in brown gravy). She said he went wild and said, "Mary, I didn't know you could cook like this," and she told him what she'd been doing in an effort to please him. Needless to say, no more "Yankee" dinners for him!

Now don't anyone go gaga over my use of the word Yankee. I'm half Yankee and I'm married to a total Yankee. So there! Big stupid grin!

13 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:35 am

1DomesticGoddess

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Crybaby wrote:Do you know what ever became of your mom's copy?

No I don't Michelle.

Crybaby wrote:My mom was a very good cook but cooked food indigenous to Louisiana.  She told me when she first married my father, she looked up recipes for "Yankee" food she could make for him -- one meal she remembered making was a "New England Boiled Dinner."  One night, she said "the hell with it" and made a local Louisiana dish (I think she made boulettes, little meatballs made in brown gravy).  She said he went wild and said, "Mary, I didn't know you could cook like this," and she told him what she'd been doing in an effort to please him.  Needless to say, no more "Yankee" dinners for him!

Michelle, your mother sounded like she was a wonderful cook. My mother a good cook. Her best dishes were... her pies, her home-baked bread, potato bread and potato rolls, potato salad, her stuffing and her bread pudding (which she made in a large oven roaster), also her hamburger gravy over mashed potatoes, goulash, watermelon pickles, pickled beets, corn relish, plus her caramel nut breakfast rolls, which she made with yams or sweet potatoes. While her beef roast was a bit too dry, she did make the best baked ham and turkey.

Michelle, do you by chance have the recipe for those meatballs made in brown gravy?

14 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:41 am

Crybaby

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DomesticGoddess wrote:Michelle, do you by chance have the recipe for those meatballs made in brown gravy?

No, Cindi, as I never wrote that one down for Brian. Simple, though. Just make meatballs out of ground beef (my mom made these simply, with seasonings -- salt, pepper and garlic powder -- bread crumbs (finely ground or chunky) and an egg thrown in to hold it together). You can make meatballs your way, say with sautéed onions with fresh garlic in there, parsley and egg. I always add chopped parsley to my meatballs, as I think they taste lighter that way. I always make a very small meatball, brown it well in the pan and then taste it to make sure my meatballs taste good; they almost always need more salt at this point, and I'm not a big salt hog anymore. It's a good way to see if you're pleased with your meatballs, though my mom never did it. Too much of a rush I guess to get dinner on the table.

Anyway, brown your meatballs in a large heavy-bottomed pan and remove to another plate. Make a roux and once it's dark enough and add onions, garlic and chopped celery. I usually season the veggies at this point with a small bit of salt (I add bouillon later so I add very little salt), freshly ground black pepper, and about a teaspoon of dried thyme, smashed between your fingers before putting in the pan. If you have fresh thyme, I add it into the dish about 5 or 10 minutes before serving. You can rough-cut these veggies or chop them finely, of course, depending on your taste. After the veggies are cooked, add in some beef broth, at least a cup I'd say; natch, it depends on how many meatballs you made (I usually use 1-1/2 to 2 lbs. of ground meat to make the meatballs). I also add about a half cup of a sturdy red wine too. I don't worry about the "gravy" being a little thick at this point in time, as when the onions and celery cook down, they will add a lot of liquid to the mix and it will thin out. I cook the gravy for about 30 minutes to let the flavors blend, and taste and correct seasoning. I usually add a generous teaspoon of Better Than Bouillon Beef flavor or the Beef Au Jus flavor at this point, as it really adds a nice bit of beef flavor to the dish.

Then I add the meatballs back in, lower the fire to a simmer, and cook about another 20 or 30 minutes. If the gravy needs to thicken, stagger the pot top on top of the pot to encourage a bit of evaporation. If you're pleased with your gravy at this point, I'd just plop the top on the pot and do a taste test after 20 or 30 minutes.

I serve the boulettes with fluffy white rice with fresh parsley on top, but we've had them with wide egg noodles before and they're super with mashed potatoes, too. But rice is perfect for soaking up that good gravy!

Hope this helps, Cindi.

15 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Mon Aug 22, 2016 10:22 am

Bugster2

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Hi Cindi, welcome to the forum. I'm Bugster2 (Debbie) age 62 and live in southern California. What is NCT forum?
I cook for 3 people: me , my husband and a roommate that we have known since high school. We have two Persian cats and our roomie brought 5 with her when she moved in. Cooking is a challenge in this house. I can't eat anything with chilies, cayenne or heat. My husband wants low salt and roomie is going through a phase where she won't eat beef or pork. Oy! Try cooking within those parameters.

16 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Thu Aug 25, 2016 10:26 am

1DomesticGoddess

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Bugster2 wrote:Hi Cindi, welcome to the forum. I'm Bugster2 (Debbie) age 62 and live in southern California. What is NCT forum?  

I cook for 3 people: me , my husband and a roommate that we have known since high school. We have two Persian cats and our roomie brought 5 with her when she moved in. Cooking is a challenge in this house. I can't eat anything with chilies, cayenne or heat. My husband wants low salt and roomie is going through a phase where she won't eat beef or pork. Oy! Try cooking within those parameters.

Hi Debbie, nice to meet you! I look forward to reading your posts and getting to know you.

Debbie, I have one daughter whose now 36, but she decided to become a vegetarian when she was 14, and also our other daughter who was 16 at that time, became a vegetarian too, but within 6 months, our 16 year old missed eating meat, and no longer was a vegetarian, but our youngest daughter to this day, doesn't eat meat. When our youngest turned 15, she lost a friend in a car accident, and then she became anorexic and bulimic. Today she has health problems, and doesn't tolerate gluten, and some dairy. Cooking separate meals for her and her family can become strenuous.

17 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 2:00 pm

Niagara Visitor


Hi Cindi, and welcome to the forum from Niagara, Canada! My daughter Cindy, used to spell her name Cindi sometimes, mostly as a teenager.

Like many people here, I also started cooking early, age 11-12. We came from Germany when I was 11, my two older sisters were old enough to work on the farm in the summer, so it was often my task to start dinner before they all came home. And I stuck with it. I was always the one who wanted to make something special when family friends came to visit. Now 'special" to us was generally only a potato salad and some sausages, but I don't recall anyone complaining.

This is a fun and helpful forum, lots of information, and I look forward to reading some of your posts also.

I don't know either what the NCT forum is. There was one years ago on Cooking.com but they closed that down.

18 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 7:13 pm

1DomesticGoddess

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Niagara Visitor wrote:Hi Cindi, and welcome to the forum from Niagara, Canada! My daughter Cindy, used to spell her name Cindi sometimes, mostly as a teenager.

Like many people here, I also started cooking early, age 11-12.  We came from Germany when I was 11, my two older sisters were old enough to work on the farm in the summer, so it was often my task to start dinner before they all came home. And I stuck with it.  I was always the one who wanted to make something special when family friends came to visit.  Now 'special" to us was generally only a potato salad and some sausages, but I don't recall anyone complaining.

This is a fun and helpful forum, lots of information, and I look forward to reading some of your posts also.

I don't know either what the NCT forum is. There was one years ago on Cooking.com but they closed that down.

Hello Niagara Visitor, it's so nice to meet you, and thank you for welcoming me to the forum!

NV, I started out cooking at the age of 10 or 11, and it was simple foods to prepare, such as... pancakes, fried potatoes, scrambled eggs, and it was usually when my mother wasn't at home, as she didn't allow my sisters and I to cook in her kitchen, nor even be in the kitchen when she was cooking. The only time I was allowed to make something in the kitchen... was at Christmas time, and I had made popcorn balls, and once in a while my mother would let me frost the Christmas Cookies.

Even though I took Home-EC cooking classes when I was in Junior High, I didn't get to cook real meals until I was first married.

NV, when you made Potato Salad for your family, did you prepare it with a cooked salad dressing?  My mother-in-law was of German descent, and always made her Potato Salad with the cooked dressing, then allow it to cool, and would add real cream to it.

About the Cooking.com forum... I remember that forum, as well as a few others, which are no longer in use. I miss those forums! Just recently the Cooking Light and Taste of Home Forums have also been deleted.

19 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 7:56 pm

Niagara Visitor


Real old German potato salad was generally made with some "Speck" a smoked type of dry ham, similar in flavour to prociutto. That was cut into small cubes, placed in a pan to render the fat, add onion and when onion is softened, pour the fat mixture on the potatoes. A generous amount of fresh chives, salt and pepper. It was always served room temperature, or even when it is still warm.

Using regular bacon will do very nicely, I have done that often. I have a cookbook called The Cuisines of Germany which has many old, authentic recipes. My copy is in German.

20 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 10:40 pm

1DomesticGoddess

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Niagara Visitor wrote:Real old German potato salad was generally made with some "Speck" a smoked type of dry ham, similar in flavour to prociutto.  That was cut into small cubes, placed in a pan to render the fat, add onion and when onion is softened, pour the fat mixture on the potatoes.  A generous amount of fresh chives, salt and pepper.  It was always served room temperature, or even when it is still warm.  

Using regular bacon will do very nicely, I have done that often.  I have a cookbook called The Cuisines of Germany which has many old, authentic recipes. My copy is in German.

How interesting! I never knew that.

21 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:08 pm

Niagara Visitor


Mayo was not available to us. At least not to the poor people, which we were! I prefer a potato salad with mayo. And for me it's got to be Hellman's real mayo. Don't give me any of that light stuff!

22 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:09 pm

Bugster2

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We frequently had German potato salad, either warm or room temp. I remember the chunks of ham and a sweet vinegar and mix poured over everything.

23 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Tue Oct 11, 2016 11:21 pm

Bugster2

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Niagara Visitor wrote:Mayo was not available to us.   At least not to the poor people, which we were! I prefer a potato salad with mayo.  And for me it's got to be Hellman's real mayo.  Don't give me any of that light stuff!

I hear ya! Hellman's is called Best Foods out here. The lite mayos are awful. Worse are those made with olive oil. I think they taste so foul.

24 Re: Newbie from Wisconsin! on Wed Oct 12, 2016 2:48 pm

Crybaby

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Bugster2 wrote:
Niagara Visitor wrote:Mayo was not available to us.   At least not to the poor people, which we were! I prefer a potato salad with mayo.  And for me it's got to be Hellman's real mayo.  Don't give me any of that light stuff!

I hear ya! Hellman's is called Best Foods out here. The lite mayos are awful. Worse are those made with olive oil. I think they taste so foul.

Count me in agreement! We use nothing but Hellman's. If I wanted to lighten something up, I would probably use some Greek yogurt to replace some of it. But the only time I ever tasted light mayo, it kind of tasted like paste. The consistency was odd, too. Not for us. Plus, we really don't use a whole lot of mayonnaise unless it's in something like potato salad or pasta salad, so I don't feel like we have to substitute.

Niagara, I absolutely adore German potato salad, especially if it's warm. I only made it a couple of times before but I really enjoy it whenever I have it.

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